Daniel Rubenstein

Daniel Rubenstein

Daniel Rubenstein joined the Radice Law Firm PC as Of Counsel in 2016. Mr. Rubenstein is an experienced litigation attorney who has handled complex cases in both federal and state courts.

Mr. Rubenstein practiced for more than five years as a litigator with the New York-based plaintiff’s firm LeBow & Associates, handling primarily civil rights and constitutional cases. His practice included cases involving discrimination and harassment on the basis of race, gender, and sexual orientation; wrongful imprisonment; excessive force; and retaliation against whistleblowers. During that time, he achieved numerous settlements for clients, had multiple cases receive media coverage, and drafted three appeals to the Second Circuit.

Prior to Mr. Rubenstein’s experience with LeBow & Associates, he practiced corporate law. He worked with the New York law firms Feldman, Weinstein & Smith and Mintz & Fraade, working on transactions including mergers, joint ventures, technology licensing, and reverse mergers, and on securities offerings and SEC reporting. A significant part of his practice with those firms involved the representation of emerging technology companies. He also worked in Tokyo, Japan with the Japanese law firms Blakemore & Mitsuki and Nagashima & Hashimoto, assisting both Japanese companies and foreign companies doing business in Japan, and working on English-language contracts and cross-border transactions.

Mr. Rubenstein earned his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2000, where he was a member of the Harvard Environmental Law Review. Prior to that, he graduated magna cum laude from Carleton College in 1997 with a B.A. in Economics, and was named to Phi Beta Kappa and to the Dean’s List for 1994-96. Additionally, he completed biology, organic chemistry, and biochemistry at West Virginia State University and Marshall University, and uses that background to assist with scientific issues in his legal practice.

Mr. Rubenstein is admitted to practice in New York and Texas (currently inactive in Texas), and in the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York.